The truth is in the chords.

Rock ‘N’ Roll was born from the rhythm
and blues of Black people.

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Teezo Touchdown

Teezo Touchdown

b. 1992
Tina Turner

Tina Turner

b. 1939
Big Mama Thornton

Big Mama Thornton

b. 1926
Brittany Howard

Brittany Howard

b. 1988
Gary Clark Jr.

Gary Clark Jr.

b. 1984
Jimi Hendrix

Jimi Hendrix

b. 1942
Lenny Kravitz

Lenny Kravitz

b. 1964
Lil Yachty

Lil Yachty

b. 1997
Little Richard

Little Richard

b. 1932
Prince

Prince

b. 1958
Sister Rosetta Tharpe

Sister Rosetta Tharpe

b. 1915

The I Made Rock ‘N’ Roll Festival honors Black artistry and authorship in rock music, bringing people together through live music, listening sessions, and media. Coming to Indianapolis May 2024.

The I Made Rock ‘N’ Roll Festival honors Black artistry and authorship in rock music, bringing people together through live music, listening sessions, and media. Coming to Indianapolis May 2024.

Teezo Touchdown

Teezo Touchdown

b. 1992
Tina Turner

Tina Turner

b. 1939
Big Mama Thornton

Big Mama Thornton

b. 1926
Brittany Howard

Brittany Howard

b. 1988
Gary Clark Jr.

Gary Clark Jr.

b. 1984
Jimi Hendrix

Jimi Hendrix

b. 1942
Lenny Kravitz

Lenny Kravitz

b. 1964
Lil Yachty

Lil Yachty

b. 1997
Little Richard

Little Richard

b. 1932
Prince

Prince

b. 1958
Sister Rosetta Tharpe

Sister Rosetta Tharpe

b. 1915

Credit the Authors

The true creators of Rock ‘N’ Roll

Sister Rosetta Tharpe

Tharpe, The Godmother of Rock ‘N’ Roll blended the secular and sacred, playing classic gospel tunes with a blues twist on her iconic Gibson guitar and incorporated countless other genres into her music to create a groundbreaking sound. While crafting an early version of rock ‘n’ roll, she paved the way for other legendary musicians such as Little Richard, Jimmy Hendrix, Bob Dylan, and Eric Clapton.
Learn More

Little Richard

Described as the "Architect of Rock and Roll", Richard's most celebrated work dates from the mid-1950s, when his charismatic and flamboyant showmanship and dynamic music, characterized by frenetic piano playing, pounding back beat and powerful raspy vocals, laid the foundation for rock and roll.
Learn More

Chuck Berry

Nicknamed the "Father of Rock and Roll", Chuck Berry refined and developed rhythm and blues into the major elements that made rock and roll. Developing a music style that included guitar solos and showmanship, Berry was a major influence on subsequent rock music.
Learn More

Sister Rosetta Tharpe

Tharpe, The Godmother of Rock ‘N’ Roll blended the secular and sacred, playing classic gospel tunes with a blues twist on her iconic Gibson guitar and incorporated countless other genres into her music to create a groundbreaking sound. While crafting an early version of rock ‘n’ roll, she paved the way for other legendary musicians such as Little Richard, Jimmy Hendrix, Bob Dylan, and Eric Clapton.
Learn More

Pictured:

Sister Rosetta Tharpe

Little Richard

Described as the "Architect of Rock and Roll", Richard's most celebrated work dates from the mid-1950s, when his charismatic and flamboyant showmanship and dynamic music, characterized by frenetic piano playing, pounding back beat and powerful raspy vocals, laid the foundation for rock and roll.
Learn More

Pictured:

Little Richard

Chuck Berry

Nicknamed the "Father of Rock and Roll", Chuck Berry refined and developed rhythm and blues into the major elements that made rock and roll. Developing a music style that included guitar solos and showmanship, Berry was a major influence on subsequent rock music.
Learn More

Pictured:

Chuck Berry

Let’s learn together.

The authors of rock ‘n’ roll inspired the “faces” of the genre

I Made Rock 'N' Roll
I Made Rock 'N' Roll
I Made Rock 'N' Roll
I Made Rock 'N' Roll
I Made Rock 'N' Roll
I Made Rock 'N' Roll
I Made Rock 'N' Roll
I Made Rock 'N' Roll
I Made Rock 'N' Roll
I Made Rock 'N' Roll

Let’s learn together.

The authors of rock ‘n’ roll inspired the “faces” of the genre

Muddy Waters & Rolling Stones. The Rolling Stones named their group after a Muddy Waters song and their music was heavily influenced by his bold form of blues.

Chuck Berry & The Beach Boys. The Beach Boys based their song’s structure and lyrical phrasing on Berry’s “Sweet Little Sixteen” and were pressured to give the copyright to Berry and listing him as the songwriter as of 1966.

Leadbelly & Nirvana. During MTV Unplugged, Kurt Cobain attributed the song “Where Did You Sleep Last Night?” to Lead Belly and many assumed that was correct. Lead Belly, in fact, learned the song from hearing a 1925 recording. He was recorded performing the song by Alan Lomax, released in 1946.

Arthur “Big Boy” Crudup & Elvis Presley. Elvis’ first hit was a cover of Arthur “Big Boy” Crudup’s “That’s All Right”(1946).

The Shirelles & The Beatles. This was the B-side to The Shirelles hit “Will You Love Me Tomorrow?” The Beatles recorded this song on their first album and it’s the first time Ringo Starr recorded lead vocals for a Beatles song.

#imaderockandroll

Steve Lacy
H.E.R.
Living Colour
Prince
01/ 04

Pictured:

Steve Lacy

Pictured:

H.E.R.

Pictured:

Living Colour

Pictured:

Prince

*Rock music is black music
*The truth is in the chords
*Rock music is black music
*The truth is in the chords
*Rock music is black music
*The truth is in the chords
*Rock music is black music
*The truth is in the chords
*Rock music is black music
*The truth is in the chords
*Rock music is black music
*The truth is in the chords
*Rock music is black music
*The truth is in the chords
*Rock music is black music
*The truth is in the chords

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